(Source: gorillajean, via morismako)

besturlonhere:

June 7th, 1942: Edward Hopper completes his best known painting, the seminal Nighthawks. When asked by a Chicago Tribute reporter about the philosophical meaning behind the diner having no clearly visible exits Hopper responded, “Shit. Fuck. I did it again. Goddamnit. Fuck. Not again. I did it again. Shit.” and slammed his hat on his leg.

(via riskyprincess)

iguanamouth:

dang

Tags: funny

Tags: animals

babylonian:

this is some Rhythm Heaven shit

(Source: vinebox, via meggannn)

Tags: funny

Tags: animals

hiccupofcoffee:

Guys

Guys

Have you ever noticed the ‘Love is an Open Door’ battle on YT where people sing the song from frozen??
Watch this

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but these guys where lip syncing so ppl got pissed and then 

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but it gets better

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much better

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(via astudyinadventure)

Tags: funny

"Roses are red / Gender is performative / Mass-market romance / Is heteronormative"

Twitter / sfgnyc: Roses are red / Gender is … (via realhousewives)

OH MY GOSH THEY RHYMED SOMETHING WITH HETERONORMATIVE!!!

(via ajax-daughter-of-telamon)

(via owldee)

sadhailey:

HANDS DOWN THE BEST SCENE OF ANY TV SHOW EVER

sadhailey:

HANDS DOWN THE BEST SCENE OF ANY TV SHOW EVER

(Source: raduyev, via meggannn)

Tags: funny

justinalanarnold:

Two-headed alligator spotted in Tampa, Florida along the Hillsborough River in the Seminole Heights neighborhood. According to Florida Fish and Wildlife, this alligator has been reported by several people. They explained that failed separation of monozygotic twins is common in reptiles and amphibians but they rarely reach this juvenile state.

justinalanarnold:

Two-headed alligator spotted in Tampa, Florida along the Hillsborough River in the Seminole Heights neighborhood. According to Florida Fish and Wildlife, this alligator has been reported by several people. They explained that failed separation of monozygotic twins is common in reptiles and amphibians but they rarely reach this juvenile state.

(via astudyinadventure)

currentsinbiology:

Scientists set to excavate Natural Trap Cave
For the first time in three decades, scientists are about to revisit one of North America’s most remarkable troves of ancient fossils: the bones of tens of thousands of animals piled at least 10 metres deep at the bottom of a sinkhole-type cave.
Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming is 25 metres and almost impossible to see until you’re standing right next to it. Over tens of thousands of years, many, many animals – including now-extinct mammoths, short-faced bears, American lions and American cheetahs – shared the misfortune of not noticing the 3-metre-wide opening until they were plunging to their deaths.
Now, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management is preparing to reopen a metal grate over the opening to offer scientists what may be their best look yet at the variety of critters that roamed the foothills of the Bighorn Mountains during the planet’s last glacial period around 25,000 years ago.
Des Moines University palaeontologist Julie Meachen said she has been getting ready to lead the international team of a dozen researchers and assistants by hitting the climbing gym.
“I’m pretty terrified,” Meachen admitted Wednesday.
In an image provided by the Bureau of Land Management, date not known, Bureau of Land Management cave specialist Bryan McKenzie rappels into Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming during a cleanup expedition.

currentsinbiology:

Scientists set to excavate Natural Trap Cave

For the first time in three decades, scientists are about to revisit one of North America’s most remarkable troves of ancient fossils: the bones of tens of thousands of animals piled at least 10 metres deep at the bottom of a sinkhole-type cave.

Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming is 25 metres and almost impossible to see until you’re standing right next to it. Over tens of thousands of years, many, many animals – including now-extinct mammoths, short-faced bears, American lions and American cheetahs – shared the misfortune of not noticing the 3-metre-wide opening until they were plunging to their deaths.

Now, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management is preparing to reopen a metal grate over the opening to offer scientists what may be their best look yet at the variety of critters that roamed the foothills of the Bighorn Mountains during the planet’s last glacial period around 25,000 years ago.

Des Moines University palaeontologist Julie Meachen said she has been getting ready to lead the international team of a dozen researchers and assistants by hitting the climbing gym.

“I’m pretty terrified,” Meachen admitted Wednesday.

In an image provided by the Bureau of Land Management, date not known, Bureau of Land Management cave specialist Bryan McKenzie rappels into Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming during a cleanup expedition.

(via somuchscience)


"Otters have a skin flap that forms a pocket so they can keep their favorite rock with them. They use this rock to break open mollusks when eating. Some otters go their entire lives carrying the same rock!” source

"Otters have a skin flap that forms a pocket so they can keep their favorite rock with them. They use this rock to break open mollusks when eating. Some otters go their entire lives carrying the same rock!” source

(Source: i-am-jacks-lost-soul, via afternoonsnoozebutton)

Tags: animals

brightness:

a dead scene kid is trying to contact me through captcha

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(via batmansymbol)

Tags: funny

kingsleyyy:

this hedgehog is cheering for u bc u can do anything image

(via zingarella)

Tags: animals